Tag Archive: BPA


Running the SBS 2008 BPA, you receive a warning item that states:

The log file for the Windows SharePoint Services configuration database is larger than 1 GB in size. For information about how to reduce the size of the log file, see the Knowledge Base at http://go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?LinkId=159745.

SQL Config Log Warning in BPA

SQL Config Log Warning in BPA

If you follow the link, Microsoft explains how to make a SQL script that will trim your database. My problem was that even after trimming the database, it was still over 1Gb in size- 1.4Gb actually. Let’s solve this.

This is not a permanent solution, but rather a solution to temporarily shrink the log files. They will eventually build back up- I plan to execute this plan when ever I get the warning.

Also note that doing this process will make the database temporarily “Full Recovery” only. which means that if you use differential backup and recovery, after this process takes place you can only do a full recovery untill the log files build back up over transactions.

Perform a full server backup.

Now check the size of the database.

Log into your Microsoft##SSEE Database (Windows Internal Database).

By entering \\.\pipe\MSSQL$MICROSOFT##SSEE\sql\query as your server name. Select Windows Authentication. Click Connect.

Connect to Microsoft##SSEE

Connect to Microsoft##SSEE

You will see several databases- we will be working with the one titled Sharepoint_Config_#########.

Databases

Databases

Right click on that database and select Properties. You will see two numbers for Size and Space Available. Look at the size. Mine was 1449 Mb. I ran the Microsoft suggested SQL script, and it was still the same size. So here is what to do.

Under the options tab of the database properties, change the Recovery Model dropdown from Full to Simple. This tells SQL to truncate the log files, meaning only a full recovery is available.

Recovery Model: Simple

Recovery Model: Simple

Click Ok.

Now Run the logshrink.sql to trim the database. You can do this through a command prompt by running command:

sqlcmd -S \\.\pipe\mssql$microsoft##ssee\sql\query -E -i
 
-or-
 
You can double-click logshrink.sql. It will ask you to log in, use the same information as above. Above the window that opens, click Execute.
Execute Script

Execute Script

 

Now go back into the Properties of the config database, click Options, and change Recovery Model back to Full.

Trimmed Database

Trimmed Database

You should see your file size WAY smaller now, happy shrinking.

You run the Exchange 2007 BPA, and get a non-default setting like this one:

BPA Alert

BPA Alert

First, I will explain what caused this. You wanted to disable some settings using netsh, namely autotuning level and rss, by entering these commands at the prompt:

netsh in tcp set global autotuninglevel=disabled

This is done fro two reasons. One, it speeds up remote desktop connections, which can be really slow. Second, it comes up in the SBS 2008 BPA as a warning and invites you to run up to 4 netsh commands to change the TCP values. Don’t you love how Microsoft tells us to fix one thing while the fix causes another problem? Hum.

Go to this key, and look at the values. They are probably messed up like mine, though some of them can be messed up and not others. Your keepalivetime key might be some high number like the rest, mine is sixty.

HKLM\SYSTEM\CurrentControlSet\Services\Tcpip\Parameters

Regedit

Regedit

So now, let’s reverse these settings. These settings are important- you can’t just go into the registry and delete or change the values. Microsoft provides a hotfix that will stop these netsh commands from changing the values- I won’t be running them again, I do not need the hotfix. Hotfix’s and my production server don’t mix well. He hotfix is here.

First, we should restore a backup prior to the change if we have one. I do not, so meh. But I will take this opportunity to MAKE a backup, in case I botch something here. Right click the Parameters folder, and click export. Give it a nice name, like tcpip-param.reg and save it someplace safe. If all else fails we can restore this later.

Microsoft provides a PowerShell script to fix these entries. Let’s see if we can get that to work. Download the script from here. You will have to log in. Ill download it and host it on WordPress. I assure you this file is safe, but if you are unsure get the one from MS. Here is the ps1 file. I renamed it to a .doc. To change it back download it and rename it to netshregfix.ps1. Here is the code it contains. you could also make a new text document, paste in the code, and save it as .ps1

NetshRegFix.doc

MD $env:UserProfile\Desktop\TcpIpParametersBackup
REG Export HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\TcpIp\Parameters $env:UserProfile\Desktop\TcpIpParametersBackup\Backup.Reg

Get-Item "HKLM:\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\TcpIp\Parameters" | ForEach-Object {
Set-ItemProperty -Path $_.pspath -Name "TcpTimedWaitDelay" -value 60 -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
Remove-ItemProperty -Path $_.pspath -Name "DisableTaskOffload" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
Remove-ItemProperty -Path $_.pspath -Name "EnablePMTUBHDetect" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
Remove-ItemProperty -Path $_.pspath -Name "EnablePMTUDiscovery" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
Remove-ItemProperty -Path $_.pspath -Name "KeepAliveInterval" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
Remove-ItemProperty -Path $_.pspath -Name "KeepAliveTime" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
Remove-ItemProperty -Path $_.pspath -Name "Tcp1323Opts" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
Remove-ItemProperty -Path $_.pspath -Name "TcpFinWait2Delay" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
Remove-ItemProperty -Path $_.pspath -Name "TcpMaxDataRetransmissions" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
Remove-ItemProperty -Path $_.pspath -Name "TcpUseRFC1122UrgentPointer" -ErrorAction SilentlyContinue
}

Write-Output "You must reboot your server for the changes to take effect"

Save the file to someplace easy to navigate to, I chose C:\. Now open Windows PowerShell. Start>Run> PowerShell.

Type in cd C:\ to navigate to where the file is. If you placed it in another location, go there.

Now type NetshRegFix.ps1

PowerShell Error

PowerShell Error

*** Before you do this step, scroll down to the next bold, asterisk’d item. You do not need to install this update- though you can if you do not have the PowerShell 2.0 yet. ***

You get an error, as if PowerShell does not even recognize that this is a script. Well, let’s update PowerShell. Go to http://support.microsoft.com/kb/968929 and select your OS. Download the MSU and install it.

It will install a “hotfix”.

Windows Update

Windows Update

Ah crap. Need to restart. So much for doing this during lunch. Ill do it at 5:30 when everyone is gone.

Restart

Restart

*** Continue from here, to complete running the script in PowerShell v1.0. ***

Wait wait. What about just running the script? Go to C:\ and double-click NetshRegFix.ps1. It opens up in Notepad. Let’s open it up in PowerShell.

Click open with, browse for program. Navigate to c:\Windows\system32\windowspowershell\v1.0\ and select powershell.exe.

Now go back to the file and double-click it. A screen flashes- did it complete? To check, go to the registry setting tcp/ip>Parameters. It should look like this:

End Result, Regedit

End Result, Regedit

You get a non-default setting when you run the Exchange 2007 BPA. It says:Disk timeout on server SOLACESERVER.solace.local is not set at the default of 10 seconds. This is normal if third-party storage software is installed. Current timeout value is 30 seconds.

As the message says, if you use some type of storage software, leave this be. I do not use any of this software, so I want to change it back to default. not that it might cause damage, but if it shows up here then it is a possability. As always make sure you backup and do this on a test server or in mock. I have no test server and I am daring, so I am going to do it during lunch on a Wednesday.

The setting is documented here.

Microsoft tells us to:

To revert to the default configuration
1.Open a registry editor, such as Regedit.exe or Regedt32.exe.

2.Navigate to:

HKLM\System\CurrentControlSet\Services\Disk\TimeOutValue

3.In the right pane, delete the TimeOutValue entry. Alternatively, double-click the TimeOutValue entry and set it to one of the following values:

On a non-clustered server, set the value to 10.

On a clustered server, set the value to 20.

If your hardware manufacturer recommends a different value for either a clustered or non-clustered system, use the value from your hardware manufacturer instead.

4.Close the registry editor, and then restart the computer for the change to take effect.

So let’s do what they tell us. Ill add some screen shots.

This is what the current registry entry looks like.

Before Change

Before Change

Double click it. Change to 10. It should look like this now:

After Change

After Change

I would like to point out this warning:

Installing host bus adapters (HBA) or other storage controllers can cause this key to be created and configured. When you install or reinstall these drivers, the TimeOutValue registry value is overwritten with the value that is required by those drivers. You may have to contact the hardware vendor to determine the correct TimeOutValue registry value for your configuration.

Read it carefully. I HAVE installed a HBA as well as a storage controller. I looked up the values for my HP Proliant, and they should be at thirty. I will leave this entry alone and safely ignore it from within the BPA.

This informational item appears under the non-default settings tab of the Exchange BPA. This happens when you customize the generation of SMTP addresses. The alert is not dangerous, and you can safely ignore it.

BPA

BPA

Let’s see what setting is causing this alert, make sure it is configured correctly, and describe what the setting is doing.

Open up Exchange Management Console and then drill down to organization Config>Hub Transport>E-Mail Address Policies. In my Exchange, I have 2 policies. In a default setup, there will only be one policy (Default Policy), and you will not get this BPA error.

Policies

Policies

Let’s explore my added setting,and what it does. I double-click my added policy which is called Windows SBS Email Address Policy. Alternately, if you are creating an additional policy you would click New Email Address Policy in the right menu.

The first page is the name of your policy. This is merely for tracking- name it whatever you want. Under that is the scope of the policy. You can set up policies to apply to only certain aspects of your AD. Mine is set to All Recipient Types (Including user account, room, contact, and equipment addresses).

Introduction

Introduction

You can further apply conditions. I do not use any but here is a scenario. You have two departments in your company: Sales and Shipping. You have two-handled email domains and they are user@salescompany.com and user@shippingcompany.com. Now when you add a new user to Exchange, you would set the conditions to identify the user’s department. If the user was in Shipping, it would automatically generate the address of username@shippingcompany.com.

Conditions

Conditions

This would be a waste of time for a small company such as mine that uses one AD container for all departments, but in larger companies this can be valuable- imagine managing email addresses manually when working with 10,000 users over the span of several companies, locations, and departments.

The next page is Email Address Policies- this is where you tell Exchange how to formulate the email addresses. I have mine set to %g.%s@company.org. The %g and %s are variables that the AD uses to identify item characteristics, in this case first and last name. When I add a user John Doe, it generates an email address John.Doe@company.com.

Policy

Policy

I could have edited the default policy which would have given me no warning, but I try to never edit defaults. In this case, if there was an error with this portion of Exchange I could delete or disable the policy without affecting email generation.

Another default setting in Exchange is under the email address tab of a users properties. Near the bottom there is a box ticked that says Automatically update email address based on recipient email address policy. If this box is ticked, changes here will affect email addresses. So get this setting right, and the addresses will be right as well.

User Properties

User Properties

Half way down this page is a table of variables and what they mean. If you are an AD guru, I am certain you can also use custom AD attributes in generation.

On the next page, set your time frame- I set mine to immediately. Let Exchange process the command and apply this to your selected recipients, and you are done.

Schedule

Schedule

You will notice the rule having a priority of 1, while the default has a priority of Lowest: This means that the new or other policy is applied before/instead of  default.

If you have problems with this policy, simply remove it.

You run the Exchange 2007 BPA and see the following information (warning) items:

Junk Store threshold is currently configured to move messages to recipient’s Junk folder when they have a Spam Confidence Level (SCL) value of 8. This is the default value for the Junk Store threshold. However, the recommended value is 4. You can configure SCL thresholds by using the Set-OrganizationConfig cmdlet in the Exchange Management Shell.

SCL Warning

SCL Warning

Following the link on the BPA, which takes you here, tells us the correct setting for the SCL Junk Threshold is 4. Im good with Microsoft recommendations, more so if it stops errors. You can change this number depending upon your organization and your desire to block out spam. The lower the value, the more “spam” is blocked, including what Exchange thinks is spam and may be good mail. I have had issues with spam in the past, 4 sounds way better than 8.

This is done by the Exchange Management Shell. Open it up from the start menu, the navigate to the scripts folder by typing in the command:

cd “C:\Program Files\Microsoft\Exchange Server\Scripts” including quotes.

Simply type in:

set-organizationconfig -scljunkthreshold 4

 

 

SCL Junk Threshold

SCL Junk Threshold

 

If you get no error, the issue is solved. If too much good mail is being trapped in spam folders, change this to 5 or 6. If you want more mail captured- spam is getting through- change this to 3. Personally I would not go higher than 3, and if you go that high make sure you enable a transport rule to give mail sent from your users a rating that will allow it through.

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